Greenhouse Gas:

Gases in the atmosphere that trap energy from the sun. Naturally occurring GHGs include water vapour, ozone, carbon dioxide (CO2), methane (CH4),
and nitrous oxide (N2O). Without them, the Earth's average temperature would be about 33°C lower than it is, making the climate too cold to support life (Schneider, 1989).(i)

Data has shown that the global mean surface air temperature has increased by between 0.2 and 0.6°C since the late 19th century. Since then, Canada's mean has increased by about 1°C (IPCC, 1996b, 2001). Theories suggest that the Earth's average temperature may increase by about 0.3°C per decade over the next 100 years if action isn't taking to change this current increase in GHG concentrations. A warming of this magnitude could significantly alter the Earth's climate. Storm patterns and severity may increase, a rise in sea level would displace millions of coastal residents, and regional droughts and flooding could occur. Canada's agriculture, forestry, and energy sectors could all be significantly affected.(ii)

Emissions by sector:

2008_fig1_tn_eng.jpg
Industrial sector contribution to 2008 reported GHG emissions, Source Environment Canada




Provincial Rankings: Total Greenhouse Gas Emissions (reported by large industrial facilities in 2004):

Province
​​Total All Gases (tonnes CO2 equivalent)
ALBERTA
109,503697
ONTARIO
77,273,825
QUEBEC
22,904,613
SASKATCHEWAN
22,425,303
BRITISH COLUMBIA
13,842,489
NEW BRUNSWICK
12,953,875
NOVA SCOTIA
11,683,931
NEWFOUNDLAND and LABRADOR
5,368,923
MANITOBA
2,460,523
NORTHWEST TERRITORIES
366,134
PRINCE EDWARD ISLAND
107,000
NUNAVUT
No facilities reported
YUKON
No facilities reported
Source: Canadian Environmental Law Association - Pollutionwatch

  • Kyoto Protocol:

In 1997, Canada, along with 160 fellow members of United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change (UNFCCC), drafted an international accord in Kyoto, Japan, that would help mitigate the effects of climate change through the regulation and reduction of Greenhouse Gas (GHG) Emissions.(iii)

The resulting agreement called the Kyoto Protocol was signed by Canada on April 29, 1998 and ratified in 2002. It became legally binding on February 16, 2005. Under the terms of the Protocol, Canada is required to reduce emissions to a level of 6% below 1990 levels in the period 2008-2012.(iv)


All information, if otherwise stated, is provided by Environment Canada.